sugar-tentacles

sassysnitch:

interrobangphan:

hiimcastieltheweepingangel:

mujertropical:

donnaluna:

shmoke-what:

oliviatheelf:

too-kawaii-to-die:

I don’t care what kind of blog I have I will blog this no matter what.

"Craving sensation: feeling unreal" was such a huge part of the beginning of my relapse. I was convinced that people in front of me didn’t even exist and I kept touching things and trying to feel sensation. I’m reblogging because I know that that was so horrifying for me and I never want anyone else to go through it. 

In case someone needs to see this

Just in case this can help someone. Some suggestions also seem harmful (eating a hot pepper really hurts!!!) but steps to feeling better and not self harming is most important. Sending you love and light

STOP SCROLLING! Please reblog this vitally important information because at least one of your followers is self-harming. Thank you!

I need this

I’ve used some of these and they really do help! Reblogging forever simply because this could help save someone

Always,
always, ALWAYS REBLOG THIS. It is so important and you have no idea if someone browsing your blog needs it.
milybird

chibilionotoko:

I finished this game last year and despite it being frustrating, I absolutely live for allegory and metaphors. It was just great for me.
Cry brings up a good point though- he says it might have been better as another medium rather than a videogame. In my opinion I think…

I agree with you! What a good point. Though there can be little details in movies, it is much more satisfying (and do-able) to discover them in a game.
Additionally the story not being linear would pose a problem for other media. They would have to revise the whole choosing a story book.
Which of course brings us back to if only the battle system and mechanics were good!

kikimerc

tickatocka:

i really want an “i accidentally broke into your house/apartment because my friend lives next door to you and i was in the area, drunk, and i thought i was climbing into the right window and falling asleep on the right couch (and i did wonder when my friend got two cats but i didn’t question it) so now i’m hungover and shirtless in your living room so um hi howya doin” au

I actually wrote this once for my Writing for Screen and Stage class.

I’m watching Cry play Rule of Rose

I finished this game last year and despite it being frustrating, I absolutely live for allegory and metaphors. It was just great for me.
Cry brings up a good point though- he says it might have been better as another medium rather than a videogame. In my opinion I think that may not work so great, because you would be less involved and I think the story would be too confusing to keep most people’s attention. However, I would agree with him that the game play drags it down. I think that if the mechanics were better (combat mostly) and there was a little less running around/ less back tracking it would work much better as a game. And the satisfaction you get at the end and finally understand it all is much greater than If it were a movie or visual novel.
That’s just my opinion though.

adaburr

hobbitballerina:

chelseawelseyknight:

witchesbitchesandbritches:

lifeundefeated:

Yea it’s clearly our “generation that’s making homosexuality a trend.” Seriously, pisses me off when people say that. look at this! It’s always been around, it’s not a trend, it’s real. It’s beautiful.

These are really beautiful images.

This makes me really happy

There’s a long history of lesbian-like activity in the West.  In the 19th century US, especially after the Civil War killed off so many young men, middle-class and other genteel girls were encouraged in Boston marriages — relationships with other women of similar educational and class backgrounds.  Since women were considered naturally chaste and disinterested in sex, these love affairs were seen as innocent and spiritual.  Women’s lives were wholly separate from men’s that young women infrequently had male friends who weren’t considered a marriage prospect.  They were encouraged to keep to all-female social circles, and the advent of women’s colleges further encouraged that.  Women were expected to mentor each other, love each other, dance with each other, with the older woman acting as the cavalier, the man in the relationship, protecting and guiding the younger, pursuing her and courting her in ways not unlike how young men would court their brides.  But the prevailing cultural wisdom was that these relationships would be limited to kisses and poetry — women were incapable of sexual desire, they tolerated sex in heterosexual marriages because men were sex-driven beasts who demanded it of them.  Without a man, it was presumed that these relationships would be chaste, innocent, and wholly emotional.  Lesbian-like behaviour is most tolerated when women are perceived as less sexual than men.  Homosexual behaviour becomes threatening when sex is involved — when, in the 1920s, women were seen as able to have sexual drives and the idea of sexually companionable marriages came onto the landscape, Boston marriages suddenly became unnatural and disgusting because they directed women’s sexual interests towards other women instead of to the proper channels: towards men.  The flapper was all about the sexually available (to men) young woman.  She contributed to the demise of widely accepted lesbian or lesbian-like relationships.  As soon as the flapper was capable of wanting sex herself instead of tolerating it from her male partner, lesbian/lesbian-like relationships were threatening, deviant, and ruined young women’s chances to become good wives and mothers.

So remember this as you look at the pre-1920s images.  Those women were allowed these passionate loves, even encouraged in them (sometimes after they managed to get a husband, Eleanor Roosevelt in particular), all because the patriarchy was convinced that women weren’t capable of sexual feelings towards one another.  As long as women were seen as desexed, as creatures of sentiment and emotion instead of passion and desire, lesbianism wasn’t a threat.  The minute women were regarded by patriarchal culture as having a natural sex drive, lesbian-like behaviour became deviant and damning.

We didn’t invent homosexuality in the past 20 or 30 or 50 years.  But we continue to labour under the belief and cultural expectation that women’s sexuality is something owed to and owned by men, forever de-legitimising women’s relationships unless men in some way benefit.